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The_Outdoorsman

moose/deer rifle

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The_Outdoorsman

next year im planning on beggining to hunt deer and moose. ive started to look around online and so far this one rifle that best appeals to my price range comes in the highest caliber of .308. so the question is will a .308 be enough to take down a moose or should i just go for the 30-06?

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Porkchop21

My opinion is the 30.06 as I have both calibers. Just my 2 cents though!

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randomheroj

30-06 or 7mm



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Hurketthunter

.308 is plenty for moose. Use a good bullet and your set

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Pro fisherman-Stud Muffin

they both shoot the exact same bullet , the ought6 case happens to hold a bit more powder, so a little bit more energy/speed.

and yes .308 diameter holes make animals dead


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2016 Dog Lake Open Champion.

Thunder Bay BASSmasters Vice-President 

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Kaptain Kirk

30-06 and 300 win mag, are my two, No Problem with moose, or anything else around here.


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nwodeerhunter

I like the .270 or .270 WMS. Flat shooting bullet and great for both animals.



Keep in mind that a good bullet and shot placement are your 2 best friends when out in the field.



Tikka T3 Stainless/Laminate 300 WSM
Tikka T3 Stainless/Synthetic .243Win
Benelli Supernova RealTree APG 12Ga.

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SherpaJ

Granted that you don't expect to take a shot much further than 200 yards at moose; as long as you're comfortable with the gun and shoot well with it, especially when it counts, then it really doesn't matter if you're shooting the 30-06 or the 308 or a even 300 RUM for that matter.



If I could recommend anything, don't cheap out on the rifle you choose, you'll likely end up regretting the purchase later. What rifle is it that you're interested in?


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The_Outdoorsman

the .308 is a remington model 700 SPS varmint bolt action rifle and the .30-06 is a remington 700 CDL bolt action rifle

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Mr. Canoehead

Dropped a bull with my .308 last year. 180gr. SP Rem Core Lokt. "The deadliest mushroom in the woods" lol. Mine is a winchester model 100 made in 1967. It feels and functions so much better than the cheap savage bolt action which I bought brand new and then sold after a few years and not to mention it has more character.


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Iron Ranger

the .308 is a remington model 700 SPS varmint bolt action rifle and the .30-06 is a remington 700 CDL bolt action rifle

That Remington while it is an excellent rifle. The varmint barrel is very heavy. By the end of the day hoofing that around you will need a gun bearer.

Buy the Rem. '06, slap a Leupold scope on it along with a sling and you can take just about any critter in No. America.

You still have to put the bullet where it counts whether it's a .22 or .458 magnum. Practice, practice and then when you think you are proficient, practice more.


20 years ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please God, don't take Kevin Bacon.

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naden

There is very little difference in ballistics between a 308 and 30-06. Both are fine for moose and many moose have fallen to smaller calibers than either of those. Both are available almost anywhere that sells ammo and are similar in price. The 308 recoil is slightly less on paper but that depends on stock design, action, rifle weight and how the rifle fits the shooter. In my opinion way to much emphasis is put on caliber. Find a rifle you like that fits you well and that you can shoot accurately. These factors will determine whether or not you can kill an animal the size of a moose more than caliber.


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Guest buckshotbadass

308, 30-06, .270 will all let the air out of whatever walks these woods and any are a fine choice. This being said its all personal preference in what you are comfortable shooting. If felt recoil is an issue, then a 308 is a better choice because they kick a bit less, especially with that heavy barrel on the varmint model and as long as you have adequate power, it's all about proper shot placement.

The 30-06 and 270 will have a bit more power at longer distance with the 270 having a flatter trajectory than 30-06 or 308 but all are quite adequate for northern ontario big game.

There are a lot of entry level rifles which will do the job but leave much to be desired in the way the bolt works or the trigger breaks. If you are able to save for a bit better quality rifle you probably would be a little happier in the end with it, but the big thing is to find one that fits you proper & that you can shoot accurately. Myself I'd definitely recommend staying away from package deals (new rifles that come with a scope) the optics are usually a horror show on them.

Optics.... There are a crap ton of scopes on the market nowadays. Some for a decent price too.

I think Vortex is a fantastic brand to look at, affordable, good quality optics and a lifetime no fault warranty. It just don't get any better

I'm getting off this soap box now & going hunting

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Guest buckshotbadass

I don't know how that thing about dogs got on that post hahaha that's killer funny

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The_Outdoorsman

thanks all for the replies.. this has given me much to think about

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SherpaJ

both those rifles you are looking at are good rifles, they're by no means an entry level rifle. Give them both a feel, I too like the SPS ( I actually think that remington has a mail in rebate on that rifle right now) but it is a heavy rifle to be hauling threw the bush, but it's up to you to balance out your priorities/options based on how you'll be hunting. The varmint rifle presents itself as an excellent rifle to begin learning how to shoot bigger calibres at longer distances but again is a pain to lug around. Another advantage of the SPS is the synthetic stock in my mind. I recommend a stainless barrel though, you will never regret it that's for sure.



As mentioned, optics are absolutely key but I personally wouldn't by vortex, even though they do have a great warranty, I know many people who have had to make use of that warranty because of defects. You cannot go wrong with a leupold scope, same warranty but I've never heard of anybody having an issue. All my scopes are leupolds so far.


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BirchPoint2014

30-06 savage an 300 win mag sako are my deer and moose rifles, first deer ever shot with my 30-06 was at 400yrds with it sighted in only for 200yrds i took two shoots at the big buck and both hit right i lined up, my 300 hits the objects at 600+ yards no issues



BirchPoint2014

 

CEO & COO of Birch Point Resort 

Kashabowie, ON

 

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Pro fisherman-Stud Muffin

my 300 hits the objects at 600+ yards no issues

:D 600+ yds . easy shot . around 60 inches of bullet drop and 18 inches drift with a breeze.

without high $ rangefinder and scope with turrrets, id say a complete miss any day of the week.

much past 600 yds and the rotation of the earth will actually cost you a couple more inches (depending on direction you shoot)

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Iron Ranger

:D 600+ yds . easy shot . around 60 inches of bullet drop and 18 inches drift with a breeze.

without high $ rangefinder and scope with turrrets, id say a complete miss any day of the week.

much past 600 yds and the rotation of the earth will actually cost you a couple more inches (depending on direction you shoot)

I agree completely with you.

That statement is just out of the realm of a "clean shot".

We hunt out west in Wyoming for Antelope and Montana for Elk. I shoot a 300 Mag. in Montana and a .270 in Wyoming for Antelope. I have never had to take a shot at any game from over 300 yards. Too many things can happen beyond 300 yards with a bullet.

I guess that is why it is called hunting - not just shooting.

Someone should educate so called hunters that makes a statement like that. Makes my blood boil when I hear someone make a ridiculous statement like that.

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20 years ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please God, don't take Kevin Bacon.

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robbo

Took my first deer with a carrot and a rubber band. Called it in close, "here, deer, come here" jammed the carrot in its throat and slapped the rubber band around its muzzle. Choked to death right there on the spot! Good thing it was friendly cause I could barely make out what it was at 400 yds.

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going fishing is okay, going catching is great!

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robbo

Sorry 'bout that, but I couldn't let that pass without some fun on it too!


going fishing is okay, going catching is great!

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Bottom Bouncer

Well we really don't know what this guys into to comment on 600 yard shots but if you look on Youtube 600 yard shots are nothing compared to what you will see on there. I think there is a video of a 12 year old shooting 1200+ yards. Anyway, the first Red Flag is a gun model that only comes in 308 or smaller. I don't know anything about this model but others have commented on the weight of the gun. This is a factor. I've owned I think every combination of make model calibre etc... Well not quite but a lot for sure. I have gotten out of the gun market for years now and currently own one rifle and it's a Tikka 270 with a Leupold scope. I have had or had buddies who have had a wide variety of calibres from 25-06, 243, 270, 280, 308, 30-06, 7mm, 300's, 338, 375 you name it we probably had it or close to it. Then I got married, bought a house and sold guns to pay for the dumbs stuff in life, like washers and dryers and fridges...LOL. Anyway it was a lot of fun back in the day.

The argument of calibre choice will go on forever because there is really no one calibre in everyone's mind as the BEST. Someone will always make a argument for one or the other. I used to shoot a Sako in a 300 Weatherby for moose with a 180 grain Nosler Partition because I thought it was a flat shooting Rocket but others would argue that. I will say it was the last gun I sold leaving me with my 270. It came down to a couple of factors when deciding on which would be my last and all round gun/calibre. I decided on the 270 because...well I'm getting old and don't want to get kicked in the face anymore. Lol. It killed me to sell the Big 300 but it was time. The gun was heavy, it had a lot of punch and did I mention I was getting older. Lol. The 270 seemed like the obvious choice for a all round calibre. I shoot a 150 grain Nosler Partition and never really felt under gunned for moose or over gunned for deer.

Anyway the 308 will do the job and in fact back in the late 50's & 60's if you had a 308 you were the champ around these parts. I would recommend to anyone, buy one good quality rifle and scope in a calibre that will last you a life time. Sako ,Tikka, Kimber etc...Leupold,Luepold,Luepold etc...oh did I mention Bolt Action, Bolt Action or Bolt Action. Good Luck on YOUR CHOICE.


REELBAIT

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naden

Well we really don't know what this guys into to comment on 600 yard shots but if you look on Youtube 600 yard shoots is nothing compared to what you will see on there. I think there is a video of a 12 year old shooting 1200+ yards. Anyway, the first Red Flag is a gun model that only comes in 308 or smaller. I don't know anything about this model but others have commented on the weight of the gun. This is a factor. I've owned I think every combination of make model calibre etc... Well not quite but a lot for sure. I have gotten out of the gun market for years now and currently own one rifle and it's a Tikka 270 with a Leupold scope. I have had or had buddies who have had a wide variety of calibres from 25-06, 243, 270, 280, 308, 30-06, 7mm, 300's, 338, 375 you name it we probably had it or close to it. Then I got married, bought a house and sold guns to pay for the dumbs stuff in life, like washers and dryers and fridges...LOL. Anyway it was a lot of fun back in the day.

The argument of calibre choice will go on forever because there is really no one calibre in everyone's mind as the BEST. Someone will always make a argument for one or the other. I used to shoot a Sako in a 300 Weatherby for moose with a 180 grain Nosler Partition because I thought it was a flat shooting Rocket but others would argue that. I will say it was the last gun I sold leaving me with my 270. It came down to a couple of factors when deciding on which would be my last and all round gun/calibre. I decided on the 270 because...well I'm getting old and don't want to get kicked in the face anymore. Lol. It killed me to sell the Big 300 but it was time. The gun was heavy, it had a lot of punch and did I mention I was getting older. Lol. The 270 seemed like the obvious choice for a all round calibre. I shoot a 150 grain Nosler Partition and never really felt under gunned for moose or over gunned for deer.

Anyway the 308 will do the job and in fact back in the late 50's & 60's if you had a 308 you were the champ around these parts. I would recommend to anyone, buy one good quality rifle and scope in a calibre that will last you a life time. Sako ,Tikka, Kimber etc...Leupold,Luepold,Luepold etc...oh did I mention Bolt Action, Bolt Action or Bolt Action. Good Luck on YOUR CHOICE.

Why is it a red flag that the gun model only comes in 308 or smaller?

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naden

and to the op, why did you prefer the 700 sps varmint over just the regular 700 sps?


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Bottom Bouncer

Why is it a red flag that the gun model only comes in 308 or smaller?

Why is it a red flag that the gun model only comes in 308 or smaller?

Well as previously stated its a Varmint rifle which I never picked up on when reading some of the previous post. I did pick up on the fact that it had a heavy barrel and in my opinion, would probably be well suited for a bipod. I may be wrong.

I do know that every gun I purchased for Deer and Moose hunting probably started at 308 calibre and went to a 375 H&H magnum or bigger. Leading me to believe that if this gun peaked at 308 there was probably a reason for it and that it was a specialty rifle that the average big game hunter would find a reason not to buy and in this case it could very well be the balance of weight.


REELBAIT

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